Show simple item record

hal.structure.identifier
dc.contributor.authorAlbert, Stéphane*
hal.structure.identifierDauphine Recherches en Management [DRM]
dc.contributor.authorAlexandre, Hervé*
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T13:55:11Z
dc.date.available2012-09-28T13:55:11Z
dc.date.issued2012-09
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/10353
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectNet interest incomeen
dc.subjectbank commissionsen
dc.subjecttradingen
dc.subjectloan impairmentsen
dc.subjectbank earningsen
dc.subjectearnings volatilityen
dc.subjectrisk factorsen
dc.subjectdiversificationen
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.subject.ddc332en
dc.subject.classificationjelG.G2.G21en
dc.subject.classificationjelG.G2.G28en
dc.subject.classificationjelL.L2.L25en
dc.titleBanks’ Earnings: an empirical evidence of the influence of economic and financial markets factorsen
dc.typeCommunication / Conférence
dc.description.abstractenSince the 1990s’, a relatively ample research has been undertaken regarding the measurement of the volatility of bank earnings over time. The comparison between traditional deposits-loans banking and financial activities is a further specific theme in bank performance research. Few analyses have however directly addressed the explanation of the volatility of earnings. The present paper provides with an analysis of the influence of economic and financial factors through the sub-components of net earnings. Using a panel of European banks over 2005-2010, a period of marked changes in banks’ earnings, we identify significant influences and shed a light on the sensitivity of activity types. We find that net earnings are positively influenced by GDP growth, stock markets and, for most banks, negatively by interest rates. The influence of GDP is primarily located with loan impairments but also with commissions. Stock markets support both commissions and, in a greater extent, trading. We identify a negative effect of interest rates for both net interest income and trading. Earnings associated with financial activities appear slightly more sensitive, but the resilience of more traditional banking activities is also affected by economic and financial factors. Our results also head towards more exposure of banks running significant additional equities-related commission activities and equity trading. On the other hand, exposure to changes in interest rates may mitigate the sensitivity of earnings.en
dc.identifier.citationpages33en
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie financièreen
dc.relation.conftitle30th International French Finance Association Conference
dc.relation.confdate2013-05
dc.relation.confcityLyon
dc.relation.confcountryFrance
dc.description.submittednonen
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershipRecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewednon
hal.identifierhal-01622842*
hal.version1*
hal.update.actionupdateMetadata*
hal.author.functionaut
hal.author.functionaut


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record