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dc.contributor.authorParadeise, Catherine
dc.contributor.authorThoenig, Jean-Claude
dc.date.accessioned2014-01-28T13:47:48Z
dc.date.available2014-01-28T13:47:48Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn0170-8406
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/12525
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectideal-type approaches
dc.subjectglobal standardization
dc.subjectlocal orders
dc.subjectorganizational diversity
dc.subjectacademic quality
dc.subject.ddc378en
dc.subject.classificationjelI21en
dc.subject.classificationjelI23en
dc.titleAcademic Institutions in Search of Quality: Local Orders and Global Standards
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUniversité Paris-Est;France
dc.description.abstractenQuality judgements in terms of academic standards of excellence required by external stakeholders such as labour markets and steering hierarchies obviously exert strong pressure on universities. Do they generate an ‘iron cage’ effect, imposing a passive and uniform conformity on global standards? The paper examines the organization of higher education and research set-ups with a strong lens. What does academic quality actually mean when observed in the field? How do universities and their subunits – professional schools, colleges, etc. – actually achieve what they call quality? A methodological and analytical framework is tested. Three sociological concepts – diversity, recognition and local order – make it possible to build four ideal types applicable to comparative inquiry. Such a typology identifies the interdependencies existing between how they position themselves with respect to quality dimensions and internal organizational measures. The paper contributes to a broader organizational study agenda: how do local orders face and deal with market and hierarchy dynamics in a global world of apparently increasing standardization under pressure from soft power. It questions the effect of the ‘iron cage’ hypothesis. It lists a series of changing patterns or dynamics between types of universities in terms of quality sensitivity, fabrication and content. Diversity and standardization in fact coexist.
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameOrganization Studies
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol34
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue2
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2013
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages189-218
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0170840612473550
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherDe Gruyter
dc.subject.ddclabelEnseignement supérieuren
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
dc.date.updated2018-03-08T12:01:58Z


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