Show simple item record

hal.structure.identifierWorld Bank
dc.contributor.authorBossuroy, Thomas*
hal.structure.identifierInstitut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD)
dc.contributor.authorCogneau, Denis
HAL ID: 743084
ORCID: 0000-0002-4355-2150
*
dc.date.accessioned2014-02-07T10:00:38Z
dc.date.available2014-02-07T10:00:38Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/12594
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectcolonizationen
dc.subjectdualismen
dc.subjectinequalityen
dc.subjectintergenerational mobilityen
dc.subject.ddc338.9en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ.J6.J62en
dc.subject.classificationjelN.N3.N37en
dc.subject.classificationjelO.O1.O15en
dc.titleSocial Mobility in Five African Countriesen
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.description.abstractenThis paper conceptualizes intergenerational occupational mobility between the farm and non-farm sectors in five African countries, measures it using nationally representative household survey data, and analyzes its determinants through a comparative method based on pooled logit regressions. We first analyze intergenerational gross mobility. Until the end of the 1980s, intergenerational flows toward the non-farm sector are high in Côte d' Ivoire and Guinea, flows toward the farm sector are more often observed in Ghana and Uganda, and Madagascar displays less mobility in either direction. The pace of change in occupational structures and the magnitude of labor income dualism between the farm and non-farm sectors appear to explain those differences. We then net out structural change across generations and establish the first measurement of intergenerational net mobility in those five African countries. Ghana and Uganda stand out as relatively more fluid societies. Côte d' Ivoire and Guinea come next while Madagascar shows a particularly high reproduction of occupations. Educational mobility accounts for the Madagascar exception to a large extent, but not for the differences between the other countries. Spatial dualism of employment, i.e. the geographic segregation of farm and non-farm jobs, accounts for most of those remaining differences. We argue that the main determinants of intergenerational mobility, namely income and employment dualisms, likely reflect a historical legacy of different colonial administrations.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameThe Review of Income and Wealth
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvolVolume 59en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissueIssue Supplement S1en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2013-10
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpagesS84–S110en
dc.relation.isversionofdoi10.1111/roiw.12037en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherWileyen
dc.subject.ddclabelCroissance et développement économiquesen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
hal.faultCode{"duplicate-entry":{"halshs-00859751":{"doi":"1.0"}}}
hal.author.functionaut
hal.author.functionaut


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record