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dc.contributor.authorAwartani, Marwan
dc.contributor.authorWhitman, Cheryl V.
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Jean
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-31T09:42:30Z
dc.date.available2014-03-31T09:42:30Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/12995
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectUniversal Education Foundationen
dc.subjectVoice of Children (VOC) toolkiten
dc.subject.ddc370en
dc.titleDeveloping Instruments to Capture Young People's Perceptions of how School as a Learning Environment Affects their Well-Beingen
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.description.abstractenThis article describes the Universal Education Foundation's (UEF) activities to create research tools and methodologies that capture the voices of children concerning their perceptions of the effect of the school learning environment on their well-being. UEF defines well-being as the realisation of one's physical, emotional, mental, social and spiritual potential. The Voice of Children (VOC) toolkit includes a survey and techniques to conduct focus groups as ways for young people to share their views. Young people participated in the development of the pilot instruments and, perhaps more importantly, they are involved as agents of change, presenting the findings through advocacy events to those who make decisions about policies and programmes that can have a positive impact on well-being. While UEF will be examining the effects of many learning environments — school, information and communications technologies (ICT) and media, and health care settings — this article focuses on the school as one learning environment. Methods to create Version One of the Voice of Children (VOC1) and preliminary findings from the initial pilot in Palestine are described. Steps taken to revise the instruments and create Version Two for Wales (VOC2) are discussed. UEF's definition of well-being and its sub-components, background research and theoretical framework, hypotheses and structure of the survey are reviewed. The overarching hypothesis is that learning environments — in this case the school — affect various aspects of young people's well-being, both overall and in its sub-components.en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameEuropean Journal of Education
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol43en
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue1en
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2008
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages51-70en
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1465-3435.2007.00337.xen
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherWileyen
dc.subject.ddclabelEducationen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen


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