Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDumontet, Magali
dc.contributor.authorFranc, Carine
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-28T08:08:24Z
dc.date.available2014-04-28T08:08:24Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1618-7598
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/13136
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectGeneral practitioners
dc.subjectQuantile regressions
dc.subjectGender differences
dc.subjectMedical activity
dc.subject.ddc334en
dc.subject.classificationjelI11en
dc.subject.classificationjelI18en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ30en
dc.titleGender differences in French GPs’ activity: the contribution of quantile regressions
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.description.abstractenIn any fee-for-service system, doctors may be encouraged to increase the number of services (private activity) they provide to receive a higher income. Studying private activity determinants helps to predict doctors’ provision of care. In the context of strong feminization and heterogeneity in general practitioners’ (GP) behavior, we first aim to measure the effects of the determinants of private activity. Second, we study the evolution of these effects along the private activity distribution. Third, we examine the differences between male and female GPs. From an exhaustive database of French GPs working in private practice in 2008, we performed an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression and quantile regressions (QR) on the GPs’ private activity. Among other determinants, we examined the trade-offs within the GPs’ household considering his/her marital status, spousal income, and children. While the OLS results showed that female GPs had less private activity than male GPs (−13 %), the QR results emphasized a private activity gender gap that increased significantly in the upper tail of the distribution. We also find gender differences in the private activity determinants, including family structure, practice characteristics, and case-mix variables. For instance, having a youngest child under 12 years old had a positive effect on the level of private activity for male GPs and a negative effect for female GPs. The results allow us to understand to what extent the supply of care differs between male and female GPs. In the context of strong feminization, this is essential to consider for organizing and forecasting the GPs’ supply of care.
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameThe European Journal of Health Economics
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol16
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue4
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2015
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages421-435
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10198-014-0582-8
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherSpringer
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie socialeen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintouien
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
dc.date.updated2016-10-14T14:30:54Z


Files in this item

FilesSizeFormatView

There are no files associated with this item.

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record