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dc.contributor.authorPiazza, A.
HAL ID: 7057
dc.contributor.authorJourdan, Julien
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-11T08:38:58Z
dc.date.available2017-04-11T08:38:58Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.issn0001-4273
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/16502
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectorganizational scandals
dc.subjectcompetition
dc.subjectstrategy
dc.subjectreligious organizations
dc.subject.ddc658.4en
dc.subject.classificationjelD.D7.D74en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ.J5.J52en
dc.subject.classificationjelJ.J5.J53en
dc.subject.classificationjelK.K4.K40en
dc.titleWhen the Dust Settles: The Consequences of Scandals for Organizational Competition
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherColumbia University
dc.description.abstractenRecent works have documented the dark side of scandals, revealing how they spread, contaminate associated organizations, and taint the perception of entire fields. We complement this line of work by exploring how scandals durably affect competition within a field, translating into relative advantages for certain organizations over others. First, scandals may benefit organizations that provide a close substitute to the offerings of the implicated organization. Second, scandals pave the way for moralizing discourses and practices, shake taken-for-granted assumptions about the conduct of organizations, and result in a shift in the criteria used to evaluate organizations within the field. Our arguments suggest that organizations whose offerings are most similar to those of the implicated organization, yet perceived as enforcing stricter standards of conduct, are likely to benefit the most from a scandal. We find support for these arguments in a county-level study of membership in the Catholic Church and sixteen other Christian denominations in the United States in the wake of a series of sex abuse cases perpetrated by Catholic clergy between 1971 and 2000. This study contributes to our understanding of the competitive effects of scandals on organizations, and carries important implications for the management of organizations in scandal-stricken fields.
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameAcademy of Management Journal
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol61
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue1
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2018
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages165-190
dc.relation.isversionofdoi10.5465/amj.2015.1325
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherAcademy of Management
dc.subject.ddclabelDirection d'entrepriseen
dc.relation.forthcomingnonen
dc.relation.forthcomingprintnonen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
dc.date.updated2018-03-16T09:12:15Z
hal.identifierhal-01505248*
hal.version1*
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