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dc.contributor.authorDormont, Brigitte*
hal.structure.identifier
dc.contributor.authorGrignon, Michel*
hal.structure.identifier
dc.contributor.authorHuber, Hélène*
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-08T08:18:21Z
dc.date.available2010-04-08T08:18:21Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.issn1057-9230
dc.identifier.urihttps://basepub.dauphine.fr/handle/123456789/3881
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAgeing
dc.subjectFrance
dc.subjectMicrosimulations
dc.subjectVieillissement et croissance des dépenses de santé
dc.subjectEconometrics
dc.subjectHealth expenditure
dc.subject.ddc334en
dc.subject.classificationjelI18en
dc.subject.classificationjelI11en
dc.titleHealth expenditure growth : reassessing the threat of ageing
dc.typeArticle accepté pour publication ou publié
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherUniversité Paris 10, Nanterre;France
dc.contributor.editoruniversityotherMcMaster University, Ontario;Canada
dc.description.abstractenIn this paper we evaluate the respective effects of demographic change, changes in morbidity and changes in practices on growth in health care expenditures. We use microdata, i.e. representative samples of 3441 and 5003 French individuals observed in 1992 and 2000. Our data provide detailed information about morbidity and allow us to observe three components of expenditures : ambulatory care, pharmaceutical and hospital expenditures.We propose an original microsimulation method to identify the components of the drift observed between 1992 and 2000 in the health expenditure age profile. On the one hand, we find empirical evidence of health improvement at a given age: changes in morbidity induce a downward drift of the profile. On the other hand, the drift due to changes in practices is upward and sizeable. Detailed analysis attributes most of this drift to technological innovation.After applying our results at the macroeconomic level, we find that the rise in health care expenditures due to ageing is relatively small. The impact of changes in practices is 3.8 times larger. Furthermore, changes in morbidity induce savings which more than offset the increase in spending due to population ageing.
dc.relation.isversionofjnlnameHealth Economics
dc.relation.isversionofjnlvol15
dc.relation.isversionofjnlissue9
dc.relation.isversionofjnldate2006
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpages947 - 963
dc.relation.isversionofdoihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hec.1165
dc.description.sponsorshipprivateouien
dc.relation.isversionofjnlpublisherWiley
dc.subject.ddclabelEconomie socialeen
dc.description.ssrncandidatenon
dc.description.halcandidateoui
dc.description.readershiprecherche
dc.description.audienceInternational
dc.relation.Isversionofjnlpeerreviewedoui
dc.date.updated2019-09-25T13:41:14Z
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